[4PM | SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse
Mar
26
4:00 PM16:00

[4PM | SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

As the debut of "The Lost Footage" on February 26th and the two subsequently added presentations on March 6th and 19th have sold out, Harbor History Museum is excited to announce two more presentations of the newly discovered footage documenting the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge on November 7, 1940. Both presentations will be on Tuesday, March 26th, 2019; the first at 4:00 p.m. and the second at 7:00 p.m.

Taken by Arthur T. Leach ­-- a toll both operator at the time -- "The Lost Footage" is the only known video of the collapse as seen from the West side, or Gig Harbor side, of the Tacoma Narrows. Hosted by Museum Director Stephanie Lile, those in attendance will be among the first to glimpse the unseen 7:30 minute video of Galloping Gertie's collapse and learn more about Arthur Leach, the research to verify the footage, and what happened that fateful November day.

"As a historian, I am naturally skeptical until I am able to confirm details. I am excited to say that documentation verifies that Mr. Leach was noted as a toll collector at the time and that this footage is a rare find," says Harbor History Museum Director Stephanie Lile. "One of the things that makes this footage so special is that this was the personal view of somebody who worked on the bridge everyday. The clip we always see is shot from the Tacoma side, so this is a whole different view."

Admission to Humanities in the Harbor is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. 

Member RSVPS can be made by emailing Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

March 26th Added Lost Footage Banner.jpg


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[7PM | SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse
Mar
26
7:00 PM19:00

[7PM | SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

As the debut of "The Lost Footage" on February 26th and the two subsequently added presentations on March 6th and 19th have sold out, Harbor History Museum is excited to announce two more presentations of the newly discovered footage documenting the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge on November 7, 1940. Both presentations will be on Tuesday, March 26th, 2019; the first at 4:00 p.m. and the second at 7:00 p.m.

Taken by Arthur T. Leach ­-- a toll both operator at the time -- "The Lost Footage" is the only known video of the collapse as seen from the West side, or Gig Harbor side, of the Tacoma Narrows. Hosted by Museum Director Stephanie Lile, those in attendance will be among the first to glimpse the unseen 7:30 minute video of Galloping Gertie's collapse and learn more about Arthur Leach, the research to verify the footage, and what happened that fateful November day.

"As a historian, I am naturally skeptical until I am able to confirm details. I am excited to say that documentation verifies that Mr. Leach was noted as a toll collector at the time and that this footage is a rare find," says Harbor History Museum Director Stephanie Lile. "One of the things that makes this footage so special is that this was the personal view of somebody who worked on the bridge everyday. The clip we always see is shot from the Tacoma side, so this is a whole different view."

Admission to Humanities in the Harbor is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. 

Member RSVPS can be made by emailing Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

March 26th Added Lost Footage Banner.jpg


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Gig Harbor Literary Society
Apr
2
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society

The April meeting will be held on Tuesday, April 2nd at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our April meeting is Mink River by Brian Doyle.
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Like Dylan Thomas' Under Milk Wood and Sherwood Anderson's Winesburg, Ohio, Brian Doyle's stunning fiction debut brings a town to life through the jumbled lives and braided stories of its people.


In a small fictional town on the Oregon coast there are love affairs and almost-love-affairs, mystery and hilarity, bears and tears, brawls and boats, a garrulous logger and a silent doctor, rain and pain, Irish immigrants and Salish stories, mud and laughter. There's a Department of Public Works that gives haircuts and counts insects, a policeman addicted to Puccini, a philosophizing crow, beer and berries. An expedition is mounted, a crime committed, and there's an unbelievably huge picnic on the football field. Babies are born. A car is cut in half with a saw. A river confesses what it's thinking. . .
It's the tale of a town, written in a distinct and lyrical voice, and readers will close the book more than a little sad to leave the village of Neawanaka, on the wet coast of Oregon, beneath the hills that used to boast the biggest trees in the history of the world.
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To view the Literary Society Spring/Summer Lineup, please click HERE.

Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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"The Real Men of CATCH-22"
Apr
11
6:00 PM18:00

"The Real Men of CATCH-22"

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly lecture series that explores unique and engaging topics for the greater Gig Harbor community, will continue in April with another presentation complementing our “Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front” exhibit.

Join Museum Director Stephanie Lile for a look inside the real world of famed novel and movie Catch-22, the very bomb group our exhibit "Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front" is based upon. These men flew B-25 bombers throughout the Mediterranean theater, risking life and limb in strategic bombing efforts that helped bring the war to an end. The presentation will include the backstory of the Bomber Boys exhibit and serves as a great intro to the special showing of the 1970 Catch-22 movie being shown at the Galaxy Theatre on April 24th in partnership with the Gig Harbor Film Festival.

Lile’s presentation of “The Real Men of Catch-22” as well as the screening of Catch-22 at Galaxy Theatre are FREE to both Harbor History Museum members and Gig Harbor Film Festival members. RSVPs are requested as seating is limited. RSVPs can be made online or directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

Admission to “The Real Men of Catch-22” is $5.00 for non-members and may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Admission to Catch-22 at Galaxy Theatre is $10.00 for non-members and can be paid at the door.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. The Galaxy Theatre is located at 4649 Point Fosdick Dr NW, Gig Harbor, WA 98335.

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CATCH-22 (1970) Film Screening
Apr
24
6:30 PM18:30

CATCH-22 (1970) Film Screening

As a complement to our “Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front” exhibit, Harbor History Museum has partnered with the Gig Harbor Film Festival to present a screening of the 1970 film, Catch-22.

April 24, 2019 | 6:30PM | Catch-22 (1970) Film Screening | at Galaxy Theatre


A bombardier in World War II tries desperately to escape the insanity of the war. However, sometimes insanity is the only sane way to cope with a crazy situation. Catch-22 is a parody of a "military mentality," and of a bureaucratic society in general. Catch-22 is a 1970 American dark comedy adapted from the novel of the same name by Joseph Heller. In creating a dark comedy revolving around the "lunatic characters" of Heller's satirical anti-war novel set at a fictional World War II Mediterranean base, director Mike Nichols and screenwriter Buck Henry (also in the cast) worked on the film script for two years, converting Heller's complex novel to the medium of film. The film will be shown at Galaxy Theatre, located at 4649 Point Fosdick Dr NW, Gig Harbor, WA 98335.


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April 11, 2019 | 6PM | "The Real Men of Catch-22" | at Harbor History Museum
As a precursor to the film screening, Museum Director Stephanie Lile will offer a look inside the real world of famed novel and movie Catch-22, the very bomb group our exhibit "Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front" is based upon. These men flew B-25 bombers throughout the Mediterranean theater, risking life and limb in strategic bombing efforts that helped bring the war to an end. The presentation will include the backstory of the Bomber Boys exhibit and serves as a great intro to the special showing of the 1970 Catch-22 movie being shown at the Galaxy Theatre on April 24th in partnership with the Gig Harbor Film Festival.
————————

Lile’s presentation of “The Real Men of Catch-22” as well as the screening of Catch-22 at Galaxy Theatre are FREE to both Harbor History Museum members and Gig Harbor Film Festival members. RSVPs are requested as seating is limited. RSVPs can be made online or directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

Admission to “The Real Men of Catch-22” is $5.00 for non-members and may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Admission to Catch-22 at Galaxy Theatre is $10.00 for non-members and can be paid at the door.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332.

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[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse
Mar
19
6:00 PM18:00

[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

As both the debut of "The Lost Footage" on February 26th and the second presentation on March 6th have sold out, Harbor History Museum is excited to announce a third showing of the newly discovered footage documenting the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge on November 7, 1940 will be shown on Tuesday, March 19th, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. 

Taken by Arthur T. Leach ­-- a toll both operator at the time -- "The Lost Footage" is the only known video of the collapse as seen from the West side, or Gig Harbor side, of the Tacoma Narrows. Hosted by Museum Director Stephanie Lile, those in attendance will be among the first to glimpse the unseen 7:30 minute video of Galloping Gertie's collapse and learn more about Arthur Leach, the research to verify the footage, and what happened that fateful November day.

"As a historian, I am naturally skeptical until I am able to confirm details. I am excited to say that documentation verifies that Mr. Leach was noted as a toll collector at the time and that this footage is a rare find," says Harbor History Museum Director Stephanie Lile. "One of the things that makes this footage so special is that this was the personal view of somebody who worked on the bridge everyday. The clip we always see is shot from the Tacoma side, so this is a whole different view."

Admission to Humanities in the Harbor is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. 

Member RSVPS can be made by emailing Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

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"Washington State in Wartime: The Home Front in 1942"
Mar
14
6:00 PM18:00

"Washington State in Wartime: The Home Front in 1942"

As a complement to the “Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front” exhibit currently on display, we are excited to welcome back audio historian and broadcaster, John Jensen for another Humanities in the Harbor presentation on Thursday, March 14, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.

Although Washington numbered only 1.7 million at the War's outset, it supplied crucial resources in millions of tons of food and raw materials, thousands of airplanes and tanks and hundreds of ships. No state was more profoundly affected economically by the introduction and expansion of war industries. Through seldom-seen film clips, radio broadcast excerpts and rarely viewed photographs, those early days of the war are vividly captured in detail. Join us as John Jensen shares rarely heard stories and anecdotes about a nation at the start of an all-encompassing conflagration and the exploits of a state that contributed more per capita to the war effort than any other.

John-Jensen.jpg

A former San Francisco broadcaster, John Jensen has been an avid collector of music, movies, and radio broadcasts of the 1930s and 40s. Early fascination led to employment as general manager of KMPX, a radio station devoted to playing the music and radio broadcasts of those years. He produced a world-wide radio broadcast honoring the US Navy 200th Anniversary, starring Bing Crosby, Mel Blanc, and other radio stars from the 1940s. In 1992, he directed the 50th Anniversary Salute to Armed Forces Radio broadcast, heard world-wide. As an audio historian, he has provided research and assorted media to filmmakers, such as Jack Haley, Jr., Frances Ford Coppola, and George Lucas. He recently retired as senior director of public relations for World Vision. Since then he has been lecturing at various venues throughout the Puget Sound area on the Great Depression era and World War II.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332.

Admission is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. RSVPs are encouraged as seating is limited. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse
Mar
6
6:00 PM18:00

[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

Harbor History Museum is excited to announce a second showing of the newly discovered footage documenting the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge on November 7, 1940. Taken by Arthur T. Leach ­-- a toll both operator at the time -- "The Lost Footage" is the only known video of the collapse as seen from the West side, or Gig Harbor side, of the Tacoma Narrows.

Harbor History Museum Collection #2786 (Photographer: J. Bashford)

Harbor History Museum Collection #2786 (Photographer: J. Bashford)

"As a historian, I am naturally skeptical until I am able to confirm details. I am excited to say that documentation verifies that Mr. Leach was noted as a toll collector at the time and that this footage is a rare find," says Harbor History Museum Director Stephanie Lile. "One of the things that makes this footage so special is that this was the personal view of somebody who worked on the bridge everyday. The clip we always see is shot from the Tacoma side, so this is a whole different view."

As the debut of "The Lost Footage" on February 26th  has sold out, the Museum will be offering a second showing on Wednesday, March 6th, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Hosted by Museum Director Stephanie Lile, those in attendance will be among the first to glimpse the unseen 7:30 minute video of Galloping Gertie's collapse and learn more about Arthur Leach, the research to verify the footage, and what happened that fateful November day.

Admission to Humanities in the Harbor is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. 

RSVPS can be made by emailing Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society
Mar
5
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

Our March meeting will be held on Tuesday, March 5th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our March meeting is Bone River by Megan Chance.

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In the mid-19th century, Leonie Monroe Russell works alongside her husband, Junius, an oysterman in Shoalwater Bay in the Pacific Northwest. At night she continues her father's lifelong obsession: collecting artifacts and studying the native culture that once thrived in the Washington Territory.

On her 37th birthday, Leonie discovers a mummy protruding from the riverbank bordering her property--a mummy that by all evidence shouldn't exist. As Leonie searches for answers to the mummy's origins, she begins to feel a mystical connection to it that defies all logic. Leonie's sense that otherworldly forces are at work only grows when news of the incredible discovery brings Junius's long lost son, Daniel, to her doorstep. Upon his unexpected arrival, a native elder insists that Leonie wear a special shell bracelet for protection. But protection from whom? The mummy? Or perhaps Daniel?

Leonie has always been a good daughter and good wife, but for the first time, these roles do not seem to be enough. Finding the mummy has changed everything, and now Leonie must decide if she has the courage to put aside the expectations of others to be the woman she was meant to be.
From award-winning author Megan Chance, Bone River is a haunting, lyrical tale of passion and identity.

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Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse
Feb
26
6:00 PM18:00

[SOLD OUT] "The Lost Footage" of the 1940 Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse

THIS EVENT IS SOLD OUT.

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, will continue in February with a truly special presentation.

Harbor History Museum is eager to share newly discovered footage documenting the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge on November 7, 1940. Taken by Arthur T. Leach ­-- a toll both operator at the time -- "The Lost Footage" is the only known video of the collapse as seen from the West side, or Gig Harbor side, of the Tacoma Narrows.

"As a historian, I am naturally skeptical until I am able to confirm details. I am excited to say that documentation verifies that Mr. Leach was noted as a toll collector at the time and that this footage is a rare find," says Harbor History Museum Director Stephanie Lile. "One of the things that makes this footage so special is that this was the personal view of somebody who worked on the bridge everyday. The clip we always see is shot from the Tacoma side, so this is a whole different view."

Harbor History Museum Collection #2786 (Photographer: J. Bashford)

Harbor History Museum Collection #2786 (Photographer: J. Bashford)

Due to inclement weather, "The Lost Footage" will now debut on February 26th, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. as part of the Museum's Humanities in the Harbor series, this time hosted by our Director. Those in attendance will be the first to glimpse the unseen 7:30 minute video of Galloping Gertie's collapse and learn more about Arthur Leach, the research to verify the footage, and what happened that fateful November day.

Admission to Humanities in the Harbor is $5, but FREE for Harbor History Museum members. Tickets may be Purchased Online or at the front desk of the Museum. Members are encouraged to RSVP as seating is limited. 

RSVPS can be made by emailing Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Development, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society
Feb
19
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

Due to inclement weather, the February meeting will now be held on Tuesday, February 19th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our February meeting is The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery.

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In this astonishing book from the author of the bestselling memoir, The Good Good Pig, Sy Montgomery explores the emotional and physical world of the octopus—a surprisingly complex, intelligent, and spirited creature—and the remarkable connections it makes with humans.

Sy Montgomery’s popular 2011 ORION magazine piece, “Deep Intellect,” about her friendship with a sensitive, sweet-natured octopus named Athena and grief at her death, went viral, indicating the widespread fascination with these mysterious, almost alien-like creatures. Since then she has practiced true immersion journalism, from New England aquarium tanks to Mexico and French Polynesia, pursuing these solitary shape-shifters. With a central brain the size of that of an African grey parrot and neural matter in each of its eight arms, octopuses have varied personalities and intelligence they show in myriad ways: endless trickery to get food and escape enclosures; jetting water playfully to bounce objects like balls; and evading their caretakers by using a scoop net as a trampoline and running around the floor on eight arms. But with a beak like a parrot, venom like a snake, and a tongue covered with teeth, how can such a being know anything? And what sort of thoughts could it think?

The intelligence of dogs, birds, and chimpanzees was only recently accepted by scientists, who now are establishing the intelligence of the octopus, watching them solve problems and deciphering the meaning of their color-changing camouflage techniques. Montgomery chronicles this growing scientific appreciation of the octopus, but also tells a love story. By turns funny, entertaining, touching, and profound, The Soul of an Octopus ultimately reveals what octopuses can teach us about the nature and consciousness of the mind.
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Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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Teacher Happy Hour
Jan
25
5:00 PM17:00

Teacher Happy Hour

Grab your teacher friends and join us on Friday, January 25th, 2019 from 5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. for a fun evening, especially for educators!

Discover the educational program offerings of the Harbor History Museum and learn how to get your class involved. Enjoy complimentary refreshments courtesy of the Museum!

If you have any questions, you can reach Timothy Young, Education Coordinator by phone at 253.858.6722 ext. 6 or by email at education@harborhistorymuseum.org. Harbor History Museum’s Teacher Happy Hour is FREE and is located at 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA, 98332.

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The Pine and the Cherry: Japanese Americans in Washington
Dec
20
6:00 PM18:00

The Pine and the Cherry: Japanese Americans in Washington

Brought to you by Humanities Washington, Harbor History Museum is lucky enough to host a second Humanities in the Harbor lecture in December as we are joined by writer and curator Mayumi Tsutakawa.

In the lead-up to World War II, Japantown in Seattle featured grocery stores, cafes, and native-language services, as well as labor and music clubs. Trading companies imported Japanese goods, and restaurants served the familiar sukiyaki, tofu, and miso soup. In Eastern Washington, Japanese farmers prospered.

Then came Executive Order 9066. Those born in Japan, as well as their American-citizen offspring, were sent, without due process, to concentration camps in windswept deserts. Throughout the West Coast, 120,000 Japanese Americans were forced from their homes. Most Seattle Japanese spent the war years at Camp Minidoka in Idaho, and when they returned, most had lost everything and could not find jobs.

How did they face this injustice and rebuild their lives? How does a lively immigrant community face racist or religious hatred? The 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 is in 2017, and Mayumi Tsutakawa, whose father was renowned sculptor George Tsutakawa, will reveal her family’s 100-year history against the backdrop of this dramatic American story.

Mayumi-Tsutakawa.jpg

Mayumi Tsutakawa is an independent writer and curator who has focused on Asian/Pacific American history. She co-edited The Forbidden Stitch: Asian American Women’s Literary Anthology which received the Before Columbus Foundation’s American Book Award. She also edited two books on pioneer Asian American artists: They Painted from their Hearts and Turning Shadows into Light. Tsutakawa received her master’s degree in communications and her bachelor’s degree in East Asian studies at the University of Washington. Her graduate thesis is one of the few documents to research pre-war Japanese American newspapers. Tsutakawa also was manager of grants for the Washington State Arts Commission and previously directed King County’s arts and historic preservation programs.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. Admission is FREE thanks to Humanities Washington! Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state.

Admission is free, but seats are limited. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Light Up the Night: 5th Annual Saint Lucia Festival
Dec
14
5:00 PM17:00

Light Up the Night: 5th Annual Saint Lucia Festival

Celebrate Gig Harbor’s Scandinavian heritage at Harbor History Museum’s 5th Annual Light Up the Night: St. Lucia Festival on Friday, December 14th from 5:00-7:00pm. Crafts, games, and traditional Scandinavian snacks are the star at this family-friendly event. $3 admission for all ages. Harbor History Museum members and their families get in FREE.

Tickets can be purchased online at the Harbor History Museum's Buy Tickets page beginning December 1st, or at the front desk. For more information contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing and Events Coordinator at 253.858.6722 ext. 5 or marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org

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"Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front" and "Local Heroes" Member Preview
Dec
7
6:00 PM18:00

"Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front" and "Local Heroes" Member Preview

Following John Jensen's presentation of Hollywood and the Homefront, Harbor History Museum members and lecture attendees are invited to stick around for a preview of our newest exhibit, "Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front" and a special lobby installation featuring our "Local Heroes."

Enjoy complimentary refreshments and an opportunity to get the first look at this amazing exhibit which highlights the little-known story of the combat, captains, crew, and camp life of the 445th bomb squadron of the 12th Army Air Corps stationed on Corsica and in Italy.

The flight and ground crew of Outhouse Mouse, a B-25 that flew more than 100 missions in the Mediterranean Theatre.

The flight and ground crew of Outhouse Mouse, a B-25 that flew more than 100 missions in the Mediterranean Theatre.

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Hollywood and the Homefront: Tinsel Town’s Contribution to World War II
Dec
7
6:00 PM18:00

Hollywood and the Homefront: Tinsel Town’s Contribution to World War II

Brought to you by Humanities Washington, Humanities in the Harbor will continue in December as John Jensen joins the Harbor History Museum for a special presentation as part of the “Bomber Boys: Portraits from the Front” Exhibit Opening. 

During World War II, the War Department realized the importance of not only keeping up the morale of America’s fighting forces abroad, but the morale of those at home. The result was an unprecedented push by Hollywood to contribute morale-building war dramas, troop entertainment, and training films to the war effort. Special radio programs, documentary films, and live performances told Americans at home that they too could serve in the defense of their country by purchasing war bonds, participating in scrap drives, planting Victory Gardens, and volunteering.

Experience the still-powerful images, radio, and film that emerged from this dramatic time in American history. Audio historian and former broadcaster John Jensen shares rarely known stories and anecdotes from Hollywood’s war effort, and shows examples of wartime propaganda through various media that was used to educate, inform, and sway American public opinion.

John-Jensen.jpg

A former San Francisco broadcaster, John Jensen has been an avid collector of music, movies, and radio broadcasts of the 1930s and 40s. Early fascination led to employment as general manager of KMPX, a radio station devoted to playing the music and radio broadcasts of those years. He produced a world-wide radio broadcast honoring the US Navy 200th Anniversary, starring Bing Crosby, Mel Blanc, and other radio stars from the 1940s. In 1992, he directed the 50th Anniversary Salute to Armed Forces Radio broadcast, heard world-wide. As an audio historian, he has provided research and assorted media to filmmakers, such as Jack Haley, Jr., Frances Ford Coppola, and George Lucas. He recently retired as senior director of public relations for World Vision. Since then he has been lecturing at various venues throughout the Puget Sound area on the Great Depression era and World War II.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. Admission is FREE thanks to Humanities Washington! Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state.

Admission is free, but seats are limited. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Firefly Lane"
Dec
4
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Firefly Lane"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The December meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 4th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our December meeting is Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah.

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From the New York Times bestselling author Kristin Hannah comes a powerful novel of love, loss, and the magic of friendship. . . .

In the turbulent summer of 1974, Kate Mularkey has accepted her place at the bottom of the eighth-grade social food chain. Then, to her amazement, the "coolest girl in the world" moves in across the street and wants to be her friend. Tully Hart seems to have it all---beauty, brains, ambition. On the surface they are as opposite as two people can be: Kate, doomed to be forever uncool, with a loving family who mortifies her at every turn. Tully, steeped in glamour and mystery, but with a secret that is destroying her. They make a pact to be best friends forever; by summer's end they've become TullyandKate. Inseparable.

So begins Kristin Hannah's magnificent new novel. Spanning more than three decades and playing out across the ever-changing face of the Pacific Northwest, Firefly Lane is the poignant, powerful story of two women and the friendship that becomes the bulkhead of their lives.

From the beginning, Tully is desperate to prove her worth to the world. Abandoned by her mother at an early age, she longs to be loved unconditionally. In the glittering, big-hair era of the eighties, she looks to men to fill the void in her soul. But in the buttoned-down nineties, it is television news that captivates her. She will follow her own blind ambition to New York and around the globe, finding fame and success . . . and loneliness.

Kate knows early on that her life will be nothing special. Throughout college, she pretends to be driven by a need for success, but all she really wants is to fall in love and have children and live an ordinary life. In her own quiet way, Kate is as driven as Tully. What she doesn't know is how being a wife and mother will change her . . . how she'll lose sight of who she once was, and what she once wanted. And how much she'll envy her famous best friend. . . .

For thirty years, Tully and Kate buoy each other through life, weathering the storms of friendship---jealousy, anger, hurt, resentment. They think they've survived it all until a single act of betrayal tears them apart . . . and puts their courage and friendship to the ultimate test.

Firefly Lane is for anyone who ever drank Boone's Farm apple wine while listening to Abba or Fleetwood Mac. More than a coming-of-age novel, it's the story of a generation of women who were both blessed and cursed by choices. It's about promises and secrets and betrayals. And ultimately, about the one person who really, truly knows you---and knows what has the power to hurt you . . . and heal you. Firefly Lane is a story you'll never forget . . . one you'll want to pass on to your best friend.
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Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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What Our Teachers Never Told Us about the American Revolution
Nov
15
6:00 PM18:00

What Our Teachers Never Told Us about the American Revolution

Brought to you by Humanities Washington, Humanities in the Harbor will continue in November as we welcome Don Glickstein to the Harbor History Museum. Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state.

Discover the American Revolution you never learned about in school. Why did Native Americans and African Americans support the British? How did a Muslim general come to fight the British with a French ally named Admiral “Satan”? Why did the fighting spread around the world, from Hudson Bay to South America, India to Africa, Arkansas to Gibraltar?

Author Don Glickstein explores rarely heard perspectives on the war in his illustrated talk, and links aspects of the war to our home state of Washington. Hear stories from the war, discover the reasons the Revolution matters to us today, and learn why the study of history can help us understand the 21st century’s war on terrorism.

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Born in upstate New York, Don Glickstein was raised with the American Revolution around him. He visited places like the Saratoga battlefield and Fort Johnson, watched “Johnny Tremain” on television, read James Fenimore Cooper, and spent summers in Boston surrounded by history. He attended the University of Massachusetts and spent a decade as a journalist in Delaware, Massachusetts, New York, and finally at the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, and won awards for consumer and investigative reporting. He was campaign press secretary for Governor Booth Gardner, then communications manager for Group Health. He has written history articles for many online and print publications. His first book, After Yorktown, describes how fighting during Revolution spread worldwide, from India to South America.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. Admission is FREE thanks to Humanities Washington!

Admission is free, but seats are limited. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "The Living"
Nov
6
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "The Living"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The November meeting will be held on Tuesday, November 6th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our November meeting is The Living by Annie Dillard.

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Ninety miles north of Seattle on the Washington coast lies Bellingham Bay, where a rough settlement founded in the 1850s would become the town of Whatcom. Here, the Lummi and Nooksack Indian people fish and farm, hermits pay their debts in sockeye salmon, and miners track gold-bearing streams.

Here, too, is the intimate, murderous tale of three men. Clare Fishburn believes that greatness lies in store for him. John Ireland Sharp, an educated orphan, abandons hope when he sees socialists expel the Chinese workers from the region. Beal Obenchain, who lives in a cedar stump, threatens Clare Fishburn's life.

A killer lashes a Chinese worker to a wharf piling at low tide. Settlers pour in to catch the boom the railroads bring. People give birth, drown, burn, inherit rich legacies, and commit expensive larcenies. All this takes place a hundred years ago, when these vital, ruddy men and women were ''the living.''
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Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

For those looking ahead... In December we will be discussing Firefly Lane by Kristin Hannah.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory
Oct
25
6:00 PM18:00

The Ancient Fruitcake: What Really, Really Old Food Tells Us about History, Culture, Love, and Memory

Brought to you by Humanities Washington, Humanities in the Harbor will continue in October with a fun presentation courtesy of Harriet Baskas. Humanities Washington sparks conversation and critical thinking using story as a catalyst, nurturing thoughtful and engaged communities across our state.

This talk is not about the old leftovers in the fridge. It is about food that is so old, so unusual, or so meaningful, that no one dares throw it away. Discover the foods archeologists have found buried with mummies, the petrified banana so appealing it sparked a Banana Museum, the 350-year-old fruitcake handed down through generations, 2000-year-old bog butter; and the pickle that has been in a jar since the 1860s. During this “chew and chat,” author and broadcaster Harriet Baskas explores how and why these and other formerly fresh foods may have been forgotten, intentionally tucked away, or preserved due to unusual or peculiar circumstances.

And, more importantly, we’ll talk about how these and other vintage vittles can and do hold memories, tell stories, and connect us with family, culture, and history.

Harriet-Baskas.jpg

Harriet Baskas has a Masters in Communications from the University of Washington, and has served as the general manager for three community radio stations in Oregon and Washington. She is the author of seven books, including Hidden Treasures: What Museums Can’t or Won’t Show You, and has created award-winning radio programs on topics as varied as cowgirls, unusual museums, aging boomers, and the Seattle World’s Fair for National Public Radio and regional public radio stations. Seattle based, she currently writes about airports, air travel, museums, and other topics for NBC News, CNBC, USA Today, and other outlets.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. Admission is FREE thanks to Humanities Washington!

Admission is free, but seats are limited. RSVPs and questions may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac"
Oct
2
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The October meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 2nd at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for our October meeting is The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac by Sharma Shields.

A dark, fantastical, multi-generational tale about a family whose patriarch is consumed by the hunt for the mythical, elusive Sasquatch he encountered in his youth.

Eli Roebuck was nine years old when his mother walked off into the woods with "Mr. Krantz," a large, strange, hairy man who may or may not be a sasquatch. What Eli knows for certain is that his mother went willingly, leaving her only son behind. For the rest of his life, Eli is obsessed with the hunt for the bizarre creature his mother chose over him, and we watch it affect every relationship he has in his long life--with his father, with both of his wives, his children, grandchildren, and colleagues. We follow all of the Roebuck family members, witnessing through each of them the painful, isolating effects of Eli's maniacal hunt, and find that each Roebuck is battling a monster of his or her own, sometimes literally. The magical world Shields has created is one of unicorns and lake monsters, ghosts and reincarnations, tricksters and hexes. At times charming, as when young Eli meets the eccentric, extraordinary Mr. Krantz, and downright horrifying at others, The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac is boldly imaginative throughout, and proves to be a devastatingly real portrait of the demons that we as human beings all face.

Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

For those looking ahead... In November we will be discussing The Living by Annie Dillard.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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Crafting of an American Dream: The Skansie Shipbuilding Co.
Sep
19
6:00 PM18:00

Crafting of an American Dream: The Skansie Shipbuilding Co.

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly lecture series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, will continue in September as Nathan Patrick visits Harbor History Museum to discuss the Skansie Shipbuilding Company.

The Skansie name is synonymous with quality and craftsmanship. Over two-hundred wooden vessels were launched from the ways of the Skansie shipyard between 1912 and 1959. These vessels kept the harbor running, fisherman filling their holds, and people traveling throughout the sound. The success of the Skansie Ship Building Co. is a testament to what can be accomplished through hard work, human ingenuity, and community. 

From Peter Skansie’s arrival in Gig Harbor to what remains of its structures today, Nathan Patrick will present the history of the Skansie Shipbuilding Co. and a detailed history of the purse seiner, Avalon.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. 

Admission is FREE for Harbor History Museum members and $5 for Non-Members. 

Tickets can be purchased and RSVPs can be made online on the Museum's Buy Tickets page or by calling 253-858-6722; tickets may also be purchased at the door. Seating is limited so RSVPs are encouraged. RSVPs may also be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Sarah Canary"
Sep
4
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Sarah Canary"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The September meeting will be held on Tuesday, September 4th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for the September meeting is Sarah Canary by Karen Joy Fowler.

When black cloaked Sarah Canary wanders into a railway camp in the Washington territories in 1873, Chin Ah Kin is ordered by his uncle to escort "the ugliest woman he could imagine" away. Far away. But Chin soon becomes the follower. In the first of many such instances, they are separated, both resurfacing some days later at an insane asylum. Chin has run afoul of the law and Sarah has been committed for observation. Their escape from the asylum in the company of another inmate sets into motion a series of adventures and misadventures that are at once hilarious, deeply moving, and downright terrifying.

Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

For those looking ahead... In October we will be discussing The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac by Sharma Shields.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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HHM Vintage Fair
Aug
11
10:00 AM10:00

HHM Vintage Fair

HHM Vintage Fair Logo.jpg

An extravaganza of historical adventures is just around the corner! Treasures past and present, booths of vintage wares, antique appraisal opportunities, demos, reclaimed items and nautical novelties are just some of the exciting aspects of the inaugural HHM Vintage Fair!

 

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 2018 from 10:00am - 6:00pm
ADMISSION: $7
[Harbor History Museum Members and Children 12 and Under are FREE]

~ BOOTHS OF VINTAGE WARES, ART and more! (All Day)

~ Special Guests from the Gig Harbor Quilters Guild

~ APPRAISALS (12pm - 3pm | $5/Item): Art, Antiques, Coins, Medals and Native Collectibles
Similar to PBS’ Antiques Roadshow, the HHM Vintage Fair will feature appraisal opportunities for those in the community that would like to know more about their personal treasures. From 12:00pm – 3:00pm, experts in antiques, art, coins, medals and native collectibles will be on hand. For $5 an item, attendees can have their piece appraised.

~ THE ROOSTER RACE (1pm - 3pm | $2/Kid)
C.E. Shaw’s Rooster Races – which became famous in the 1930’s – will be making a comeback: this time as a fun game for kids, not the racing of actual roosters. Split into three different age groups (4-6, 7-9, and 10-12), kids will don rooster masks and compete in a “red light, green light” style game to see who will take home the coveted Rooster Race Championship. Sign-ups for the Rooster Race will begin at 10:00 a.m. and close just prior to the start of the race at 1:00 p.m. Entry into the race is $2 and comes with a paper rooster mask to race in. The Rooster Race will be held from 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. in various heats.

~ DELICIOUS FOOD AVAILABLE (From Chef Sunshine Catering, All Day)

~ LIVE MUSIC BY RANGER & THE REARRANGERS (3:30pm - 5:30pm)

~ THE ROUND ROCK CONTEST (Winners Announced at 5:30pm)

~ GIG HARBOR HISTORY | GALLERY TOURS (Top of Every Hour from 11am - 4pm)
[TOURS BEGIN AT 11:00a, 12:00p, 1:00p, 2:00p, 3:00p, and 4:00p.]

~ 1901 SCHOOL SESSIONS (:40 Past the Hour from 11am - 4pm)
During the Vintage Fair, guests will also have the opportunity to experience school life at the turn of the century with scheduled classes in the Midway Schoolhouse, taught by in-character school marms! [SESSIONS START AT 11:40a, 12:40p, 1:40p, 2:40p, and 3:40p.]

~ SHENANDOAH TOURS (11am - 4pm)
Tour the 1925 Skansie-built purse seiner and have all your questions answered by our very own Shenandoah Crew.

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From Norway to Gig Harbor: "Being Salmon, Being Human"
Aug
8
6:00 PM18:00

From Norway to Gig Harbor: "Being Salmon, Being Human"

BEING SALMON, BEING HUMAN
$25 Admission / $20 for Members
Bar opens at 5:30 p.m. // Performance from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m.

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Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, continues in August with a unique performance as we welcome some special visitors all the way from Norway!

Created and performed by Norwegian-British storyteller Georgiana Keable, philosopher Martin Lee Mueller and renowned Sami joiker and composer Torgeir Vassvik, "Being Salmon, Being Human" is a unique storytelling performance combining traditional Norwegian tales, original music, and contemporary philosophy.

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Inspired by Martin Lee Mueller’s award-winning book of the same name, and drawing on salmon stories from Sami and First Nations peoples of Scandinavia and North America, the performance takes us on a journey through the extraordinary lives of wild salmon - sentient beings who are born in rivers, traverse the oceans, and return towards the end of their lives to their birth rivers to spawn and gift forward more life. The performance explores what becomes of this awe-inspiring creature and her journey in the face of an expansive, profit-driven feedlot industry.

The life-cycle of the salmon has been celebrated in human cultures since time immemorial. How does the now-dominant story of separation affect our age-old relationship with this extraordinary creature? Who are salmon, and who are we in relation to them?

By interweaving stories old and new against a powerful backdrop of traditional song and contemporary sound art, "Being Salmon, Being Human" offers surprising and evocative insights into the ancient relationship between humans and the larger living world.

"Being Salmon, Being Human" will be held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. Admission is $20 for Harbor History Museum members and $25 for Non-Members. Tickets can be purchased online on the Museum's Buy Tickets page or by calling 253-858-6722; tickets may also be purchased at the Museum front desk. 

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ABOUT THE PERFORMERS:

Martin Lee Mueller, PhD, received his doctorate in philosophy from the University of Oslo in 2016. Before that, he received his master’s degree in culture, environment, and sustainability at the University of Oslo’s Center for Development and the Environment (SUM). He has previously helped build teaching centers in rural Mongolia, worked as a kindergarten teacher, been an elementary school librarian, and led a wilderness school in the Norwegian forest. Recently he has also been touring as a storyteller to festivals in the U.K. and Scandinavia, with a stage performance inspired by this book, which weaves together philosophy, traditional storytelling, and Samí joik music. He lives in Oslo together with his partner and daughter.

www.chelseagreen.com/product/being-salmon-being-human

Georgiana Keable is a pioneer for rebirth of Storytelling. Storywalks in the forests and mountains of Norway reach thousands of teenagers annually. She started the Storytelling House (Fortellerhuset), founded the Norwegian Storytelling Festival and received Oslo's Artists Prize for outstanding contribution to the cultural life. Georgiana tells stories reflecting our relation with Nature. As a medieval pilgrim on the Pilgrims way or as the botanist Marianne North she tells at the site of the Viking ship burial in South Norway. She also walks, sleeping in a hammock and collecting stories from strangers about how people and nature are connected. She has told at festivals worldwide and recently published Natural Storyteller - Wildlife Tales for Telling.

www.georgiana.net

Arctic soundpoet Torgeir Vassvi creates a new vision of animistic Joik - the vocal art of the Sami indigenous people of Northern Europe – and updates vocal and percussion rituals for the 21st century. As a Sami vocalist, musician and composer, his work connects tradition and innovation and sets trends in the global music scene. Moreover, he takes part in activities, concerts and conferences concerning the arts and rights of indigenous people worldwide. He has been described as “a magnetic and individual live performer, among the most fascinating and intense of Sami contemporary joikers. A true original." (Andrew Cronshaw, Folkroots)

www.vassvik.com

Illustration by April White, with permission from Chelsea Green Publishing.

Questions and inquiries may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Humanities in the Harbor: "The Songs We Hide"
Jul
19
6:00 PM18:00

Humanities in the Harbor: "The Songs We Hide"

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly lecture series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, will continue in July as author Connie Hampton Connally visits Harbor History Museum to discuss her debut novel inspired by the music and turbulent history of twentieth-century Hungary.

Connally's interest in Hungary's turbulent past grew out of her love of music. Through music she discovered the story of Zoltán Kodály, a twentieth-century Hungarian composer who spread music in his nation despite totalitarianism and two world wars. Connally began researching Hungary, and the tense national narrative coupled with the poignant stories of its people led her to write The Songs We Hide.

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On Thursday, July 19th, we invite you to join Connally as she discusses her research and the reasons she came to choose this topic for her novel. From an overview of the historical situation and the tension this brought to bear on ordinary citizens to interspersed excerpts from her novel, Connally will give the audience a sense for the dilemmas that the people in Hungary (and other Soviet bloc countries) were going through at this time. She will share some of the stories of the Hungarians she interviewed, many of whom are now living in the Puget Sound region.

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...In 1951, a grim hush has settled over Hungary. After a lost war and a brutal transition to communism, Hungarians live under constant threat of blacklisting, property confiscation, arrest, imprisonment and worse. In this milieu of dread, the best land of Péter Benedek’s peasant family is seized and his life upended. Moving to Budapest for a manual labor job, Péter meets Katalin Varga, an unwed mother whose baby’s father has vanished, most likely at the hands of the secret police. Both Péter and Katalin keep their heads down and their mouths clamped shut, because silence is the only safety they know.

The two have something in common besides fear: they are singers whose very natures make the silence unbearable. When Katalin starts giving Péter voice lessons, they take an intrepid step out of hiding. Little by little they tell each other what they cannot tell others. In their bond of trust, they find relief and unexpected happiness.

Yet the hurts and threats in their lives remain, waiting. As harsh reality assaults them again, is hope even possible? Facing their hardest trials yet, Péter and Katalin learn to carve dignity and beauty out of pain.

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Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. 

Admission is FREE for Harbor History Museum members and $5 for Non-Members. 

Tickets can be purchased online on the Museum's Buy Tickets page or by calling 253-858-6722; tickets may also be purchased at the door. 

Questions and inquiries may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Boneshaker"
Jul
18
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Boneshaker"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The July meeting not be held on the normal first Tuesday of the month, instead it will be held on Wednesday, July 18th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for the July meeting is Boneshaker by Cherie Priest.

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In the early days of the Civil War, rumors of gold in the frozen Klondike brought hordes of newcomers to the Pacific Northwest. Anxious to compete, Russian prospectors commissioned inventor Leviticus Blue to create a great machine that could mine through Alaska's ice. Thus was Dr. Blue's Incredible Bone-Shaking Drill Engine born.

But on its first test run the Boneshaker went terribly awry, destroying several blocks of downtown Seattle and unearthing a subterranean vein of blight gas that turned anyone who breathed it into the living dead.

Now it is sixteen years later, and a wall has been built to enclose the devastated and toxic city. Just beyond it lives Blue's widow, Briar Wilkes. Life is hard with a ruined reputation and a teenaged boy to support, but she and Ezekiel are managing. Until Ezekiel undertakes a secret crusade to rewrite history.

His quest will take him under the wall and into a city teeming with ravenous undead, air pirates, criminal overlords, and heavily armed refugees. And only Briar can bring him out alive.

Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

For those looking ahead... We will not be having a meeting in August.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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How Ann Davison and "Felicity Ann" Sailed Into Women's History
Jun
27
6:00 PM18:00

How Ann Davison and "Felicity Ann" Sailed Into Women's History

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly lecture series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, will continue in June as The Community Boat Project’s Shelly Randall and the Felicity Ann sail into Gig Harbor.

On Wednesday, June 27th at 6:00 p.m., Randall will share the story of Ann Davison (1914-1992), the first woman to sail solo across the Atlantic Ocean. It is a story of tragedy and triumph, of love and adventure, and of incredible determination in the face of adversity.

This FREE presentation will tell the story of an indomitable woman conquering the Atlantic Ocean without the aid of modern conveniences such as sat-navs, constant radio communication and an on-hand support team. Davison achieved this feat in 1952 in a little 23-foot, wooden-hulled sloop built in Cornwall, UK named Felicity Ann.

Randall's presentation is part of Felicity Ann’s “Victory Lap” voyage around the Salish Sea with an all-women crew. Recently restored at the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding, Felicity Ann is calling at eight ports over three weeks to share her “floating story.” Along with Gig Harbor, Felicity Ann will be visiting Port Ludlow, Edmonds, Poulsbo, Port Orchard, Bremerton, Bainbridge, and Seattle.

How Ann Davison and "Felicity Ann" Sailed Into Women's History will detail the adventurous life of Felicity Ann's record-breaking sailor and how her boat ended up in Port Hadlock to begin a new life as a sailing platform to inspire and empower us all — but especially women and girls.

Ann Davison and  Felicity Ann  after accomplishing their historic solo sail.

Ann Davison and Felicity Ann after accomplishing their historic solo sail.

The public is invited down to the Jerisich Public Dock to view Felicity Ann, which is now home-ported in Port Hadlock under the care of the Community Boat Project, a maritime educational nonprofit organization. Crew members will be on hand to facilitate below-deck tours and answer questions during formal “open hours” from 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. and 3:00 - 6:00 p.m. Humanities in the Harbor attendees will also be invited to visit the Felicity Ann following Randall's presentation.

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332. 

Admission is FREE, but donations are gratefully accepted.

Questions and inquiries may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Understanding Tax Law and Charitable Giving with John Reinmuth
Jun
22
4:00 PM16:00

Understanding Tax Law and Charitable Giving with John Reinmuth

Harbor History Museum members are invited to join John Reinmuth, CFP on Friday, June 22nd at 4:00pm for a FREE presentation on the changing tax laws and how they pertain to charitable giving. 

Reinmuth has devoted his entire adult life to helping others. For 38 years he guided people toward spiritual wholeness as he led United Methodist congregations throughout the State of Washington.  Continuing his passion to help others, he then chose to become a financial planner so that he could help people find financial wholeness. In 2015, Reinmuth established Wellspring Financial Planners PLLC in Gig Harbor, Washington.

Questions and RSVPs may be directed to Nora Thompson, Membership Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at membership@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253.858.6722 ext. 232.

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Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Highest Tide"
Jun
5
6:00 PM18:00

Gig Harbor Literary Society: "Highest Tide"

Harbor History Museum and the Gig Harbor branch of the Pierce County Library invite you to join the Gig Harbor Literary Society, dedicated to exploring the literary world of historical fiction, nonfiction, and other works of interest. 

The June meeting will be held on Tuesday, June 5th at 6:00 p.m. at the Harbor History Museum. The book for the June meeting is Highest Tide by Jim Lynch.

Highest Tide.jpeg

One moonlit night, thirteen-year-old Miles O'Malley sneaks out of his house and goes exploring on the tidal flats of Puget Sound. When he discovers a rare giant squid, he instantly becomes a local phenomenon. But Miles is really just a kid on the verge of growing up, infatuated with the girl next door, worried that his parents will divorce and fearful that everything, even the bay he loves, is shifting away from him.

Attendees are welcome to bring an appetizer or dish to share with fellow bibliophiles. The Museum will provide complimentary non-alcoholic beverages. Enjoy a drink while you talk books? You are welcome to BYOW (Bring Your Own Wine). Library and Museum staff will lead the discussion. Materials will be available for checkout at the Gig Harbor Library, as well as for purchase online at Barnes and Noble and Amazon.com.

For those looking ahead... In July we will be discussing Boneshaker by Cheri Priest.

This event is FREE and open to the public. Seats are limited; RSVPs are encouraged. To RSVP or for questions, please contact Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator, at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253-858-6722.

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Peninsula Community Chorus Performance
Jun
1
7:00 PM19:00

Peninsula Community Chorus Performance

The Peninsula Community Chorus has been proud to perform fine choral music for Gig Harbor and the surrounding area for over sixty years. On Friday, June 1st, 2018 the Chorus will be performing a Nautical-themed program at Harbor History Museum as we help kick off Gig Harbor's Maritime Festival weekend. We invite you to join us for this special night of music as we celebrate the rich Maritime history of our community.

Admission is FREE for Harbor History Museum members and $5 for Non-Members. 
Community admission will help support both the Peninsula Community Chorus and the Harbor History Museum. 

Tickets can be purchased online on the Museum's Buy Tickets page or by calling 253-858-6722; tickets may also be purchased at the door. 

Questions and inquires about the performance may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing and Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org or 253.858.6722 ext. 5.

For questions specifically related to the Peninsula Community Chorus, please reach out to PCC Director Staci Webb at peninsulacommunitychorus@gmail.com.

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CONJUNCTION:   The Emerging Connection of Cannery Row, the historic Pacific Northwest,  John Steinbeck & Ed Ricketts, the Sea of Cortez, and the Saga of the Western Flyer
May
17
6:00 PM18:00

CONJUNCTION: The Emerging Connection of Cannery Row, the historic Pacific Northwest, John Steinbeck & Ed Ricketts, the Sea of Cortez, and the Saga of the Western Flyer

Humanities in the Harbor, a monthly lecture series that explores unique and engaging topics for the Gig Harbor community, will continue in May as the Harbor History Museum invites you to enjoy a unique and engaging presentation with Cannery Row historian, founder and president emeritus of the Cannery Row Foundation, Michael Hemp.

“CONJUNCTION: The Emerging Connection of Cannery Row, the historic Pacific Northwest, John Steinbeck & Ed Ricketts, the Sea of Cortez, and the Saga of the Western Flyer" is an exclusive archival photo presentation that will take place Thursday, May 17, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. at Harbor History Museum.

Ed Ricketts Kneeling in Kelp (1930)  from Pat Hathaway Collection  www.caviews.com

Ed Ricketts Kneeling in Kelp (1930) from Pat Hathaway Collection www.caviews.com

America's pioneering marine biologist Ed Ricketts co-authored the 1939 text Between Pacific Tides with Jack Calvin. The book is still often used by marine biology students along with John Steinbeck’s Sea of Cortez, inspired by Ricketts and his work.

It was the kneeling photo of Ed Ricketts (left) from the Pat Hathaway Collection at California Views that inspired Hemp to research the maritime, literary, and ecological connection between Monterey’s Cannery Row and the history of the Pacific Northwest.

Since 1983, Hemp and The History Company have been a major source of historical research on author John Steinbeck's world-famous Cannery Row literature and the ecological fame of Ed Ricketts. Hemp now turns his focus to Pacific Northwest historical research, exploration, and celebration of the emerging discoveries that connect Cannery Row and the Pacific Northwest in many unexpected and meaningful ways.

   The   Western Flyer   at her 1937 Tacoma launch at Western Boat Builders. Courtesy of the Petrich Family Collection

 

The Western Flyer at her 1937 Tacoma launch at Western Boat Builders. Courtesy of the Petrich Family Collection

Humanities in the Harbor is held at Harbor History Museum, 4121 Harborview Drive, Gig Harbor, WA 98332.

Admission is FREE for Harbor History Museum members; Non-Members: $5. 

Tickets can be purchased online on the Museum's Buy Tickets page or by calling 253-858-6722; tickets may also be purchased at the door. 

Questions and inquiries may be directed to Zachary Sokolik, Marketing & Events Coordinator at Harbor History Museum at marketing@harborhistorymuseum.org.

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Cocktails & Fishtales with Harbor WildWatch
May
16
5:30 PM17:30

Cocktails & Fishtales with Harbor WildWatch

Topic: Eyes Over Puget Sound. When Climate and Human Pressures Combine. 

Join Harbor WildWatch at the Museum for this presentation by Dr. Christopher Krembs, Lead Oceanographer for Eyes Over Puget Sound, a program of the Washington State Department of Ecology. Through this unique program, marine scientists take to the skies and seas to gather water data and obtain high-resolution aerial photo observations at 37 remote marine monitoring stations. 

Dr. Krembs will present an image-rich documentation of water quality issues in Puget Sound and discuss how recent climate impacts can increase the vulnerability to human pressures. 

Guests over the age of 21 are welcome. Doors open at 5:30 pm and the presentation begins at 6:00 pm. Drinks will be available for purchase. Steward Club and Harbor History Museum members are free; non-members $5.

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